Things you should keep in mind before working in NHS- (National Health Services)

Things you should keep in mind before working in NHS- (National Health Services)
Things you should keep in mind before working in NHS- (National Health Services)

Things you should keep in mind before working in NHS:

National Health Service (NHS) is a comprehensive, publicly funded healthcare system for public-health service under government administration in the United Kingdom. Their service is available to all irrespective of gender, race, disability, age, sexual orientation, religion, or belief, benefiting all UK citizens’ health care based on their need for medical care rather than their ability to pay for it. The National Health Service is an example of a universal healthcare system.

Their services are in three groups, general practitioner and dental care services, hospital and specialist services, and local health authority services. Their approach is to deliver the NHS Long Term Plan to aim at the best outcomes for patients. Clinicians and leaders who lead the local implementation are directly accountable for patient care and efficient public money use. This service will ensure local health systems. General practitioners or give primary medical care to a group of persons who register with them. The government pays these doctors and dentists to operate their practices according to the number of people registered. an executive council organizes these services locally. 

Professionals provide hospital and specialist services on government salaries working in government-owned hospitals and other facilities; it is under regional authorities called hospital boards. Local health authority services provide maternity and child welfare, post hospital care, home nursing, immunisation, ambulance service, and other preventive and educational services. They may also operate family-planning clinics, as well as day nurseries for children. 

The service benefits of NHS are: 

  • you can visit a doctor or a nurse at a doctor’s surgery
  • you can get help and treatment at a hospital if you are unwell or injured
  • to see a midwife if you are pregnant
  • You can get urgent help from healthcare professionals working in the ambulance services if you have severe or life-threatening injuries or health problems like being transported to a hospital.

Public Health of the UK is responsible to:

  • Make the public healthier and promote healthier lifestyles, advise the government.
  • Protect the nation from public health hazards.

– Prepare for and respond to public health emergencies. They are responsible for improving the health of the whole population 

-Support local authorities and the NHS to plan and provide health and social care services such as immunization and screening programmes and to develop the public health system and its specialist workforce

– Research, collect and analyze data to improve understanding of public health challenges and provide answers to public health problems.

Suppose you want to work immediately on your first day in the NHS. In that case, you might need to navigate some very British idioms spoken by both patients and fellow healthcare professionals alike. Here are ten often used but quite confusing phrases to help you get started. Suppose you use the OET Living the Language guide. It is an excellent way for you to ensure that you have exact language skills. You can read and download from it. You will get information on phrases, values and processes unique to the UK.  

Few remarkable phrases you might know: 

1.“Fancy a cuppa?”

‘meaning: ‘Would you like a cup of tea?

2. “I’m knackered.”

Meaning: “I’m exhausted.”

3. “Oh, sorry.”

‘Meaning:’ I’m polite

4. “A real dog’s dinner.”

‘Meaning:’ A mess or fiasco

this means something is a mess.

5. “You’re full of beans!”

Meaning: You’ve got lots of energy

6. “I’m gutted.”

Meaning: To be sad or devastated

7. “That’s a load of rubbish.”

Meaning: ”I don’t believe you, or it’s a lie.’

8. “Don’t beat around the bush”

Meaning: Be direct

9. “Actions speak louder than words.”

‘Meaning:’ What you do is more meaningful than what you say. 

10. “It’s raining cats and dogs.”

‘Meaning:’ Heavy rain

You can find various professional language tips and common speaking patterns in the Living the Language guide; if you want to practice more about communication in the UK. 

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